Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

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Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Ranger52899 on Fri Feb 02, 2018 1:42 pm

There are over 1500 of us here, and we come from all around the world, and sharing stories together in the dark long evenings of winter is one of the oldest and deepest traditions amongst worldwide communities. 


So this thread is for sharing a piece of folklore and/or a ghost story from the part of it where you live! (or share several. Go on, share a ton, we're listening!) We'd love to know something about the place you come from. 

Anything scary  affraid is fully welcomed, as is the tragic  and dramatic   


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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Ranger52899 on Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:00 pm

And I'll start this one. 

I come from the Nene Valley, a very river-filled and watery bit of the English midlands. It's filled with ghost stories and in particular stories of hounds. With some of them, the sight of the hound is supposed to be an ill omen. With others, on particular roads, a hound has been known to join and walk alongside night time lone travellers and guard them on their way. 

But near to me are two buildings particularly full of ghosts. One is an abbey, where from 1145 AD a community of nuns lived and sang the hours through the day and night for 400 years. The peace is still something you can feel as you walk through the woods and gardens. One of the major medieval battles of England took place on the abbey grounds, and 500 boys and men died that day. The nuns nursed the wounded and buried many on the grounds after the battle. People walking in the woods and on the water meadow beside the abbey still sometimes hear hoof beats and galloping horses, the clash of swords and shouts of soldiers, and sometimes a slow procession of women in grey habits, singing as they walk, is seen moving through the woods. 

Some miles away is another medieval remnant, the ruins of an abandoned but still consecrated church built over a holy well. It has several known ghosts, including several children seen in the meadow among the ruins, but the best known is a red haired woman who is drawn to single men walking there and will join them, and steal a kiss if she can.


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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by LLALVA on Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:28 pm

Today is the Candelaria day in Mexico, it translates as the Candle day, and it is a tradition to eat tamales and hot chocolate today. 
The tamales are made of cornflour and lard, and are filled in with pork or chicken or chiles, and have several options in sauces, like red, green, or mole. They can also be sweet, and have fillings of pine apple and raisins. 
The Mexican chocolate is not too sweet, and hot is great. 

I hope you could be able to smell them, they are soft and warm and tasty 

https://www.thinglink.com/scene/835283430462717953

All day long, in the work places and homes, people get together today to share the tamales with family and friends. 


Hugs

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Ranger52899 on Fri Feb 02, 2018 2:56 pm

I'm now craving tamales, they sound wonderful!
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Meirene6307 on Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:24 pm

Ursula Kemp was hung as a witch in 1582 after being accused of causing the deaths of two children. The story goes that Ursula was a midwife but cursed a child when the mother decided to choose her neighbour to deliver the baby instead.


She was imprisoned in a cottage in St Osyth called the cage.  And is said to still haunt the place
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by LLALVA on Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:27 pm

In Mexico one of the most famous ghost stories is about a woman called, La llorona. 

It is a tragic love story, around 500 years ago when the Mexico was still known as the New Spain, a native woman fell in love with a Spanish soldier and had three children with him, she was promised marriage and family life, but the man never intender to marry her, and when she learned that he had married a Spanish woman. Heart broken, this woman took her children to the river and they all drowned. It is told that you can hear her crying at night for her drowned children and maybe even see her walking close to rivers or bodies of water. 

She cries  Hay mis hijos, hay mis hijos!  

And it is also told that if you hear her or see her you are drawn to follow her and if you are not snaped from the trans-like state, you may fall in a ravine or a river. 

affraid

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Dizzy on Fri Feb 02, 2018 3:54 pm

I love tamales, @LLALVA.  My favorite are the pork tamales, but every time I go to New Mexico or Arizona, I try a new tamale.  I have to admit that I didn’t realize that there was such a variety of tamales!


I swear I could smell them as I read your post.



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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by KateM on Fri Feb 02, 2018 7:05 pm

Oooh... I have some nice (well no not really now I think of it) ghost stories from around here (ish) .. I shall post tomorrow about some of the ghosts that haunt the Peak District..
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Hayjude on Fri Feb 02, 2018 8:39 pm

Not that many historic memories found here but one that I’ve seen myself is The Lady in White who used to come from up in the clock tower of our old local hospital. Blame it on working nights with not enough sleep or vivid imagination, but patients also used to ask about her, because our uniform is navy blue, so she was noticeable. She would drift about, checking the windows were locked but never really interacted with anyone. You would see a slow drift of white pass by up high. Invariably sent a shiver down your spine.

she sometimes hung about if someone was dieing late at night. Us older nurses would say to keep an eye out for The Lady in White. And we would find a locked window opened just a little - to let the soul fly home. Even now I like the window open a little if I’m with a dying patient. I haven’t seen or heard about her since the old hospital was pulled down and replaced with a new ground floor building about 15 years ago. Nothing but mice up there now!


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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by DeeDee on Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:01 pm

@LLALVA wrote:Today is the Candelaria day in Mexico, it translates as the Candle day, and it is a tradition to eat tamales and hot chocolate today. 
The tamales are made of cornflour and lard, and are filled in with pork or chicken or chiles, and have several options in sauces, like red, green, or mole. They can also be sweet, and have fillings of pine apple and raisins. 
The Mexican chocolate is not too sweet, and hot is great. 

I hope you could be able to smell them, they are soft and warm and tasty 

https://www.thinglink.com/scene/835283430462717953

All day long, in the work places and homes, people get together today to share the tamales with family and friends. 


Hugs
I love tamales - usually a mix of pork and beef.  There is one place I know that makes the absolute BEST tamales but it's over a two hour drive from me.  I was very near it on Monday and had thought about stopping.  Your story makes me wish I would have taken the short detour to go get some.  

I hope you enjoy Candelaria day (and those tamales). 

Dee
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by DeeDee on Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:28 pm

Not a ghost story, just a bit of history. 

I moved to Galveston, Texas around five years ago and I wanted to share a bit of the ghost history of the island.  In 1900 we had a major hurricane, back in the days before they were named, so it's just called The Great Galveston Hurricane.  Over 6000 people died, some in their homes but most were washed out into the streets or out to sea (in Galveston Bay) only to wash back up days later.  Bodies were everywhere.  Most of the bodies were taken to the beach and burned there - since no one knew who they were and nothing existed at the time to identify them.  But a bit further inland (Galveston is only 3 miles wide) there were also bodies being found.  It was finally decided to bury the bodies where they were found.  It's said that when there are repairs needed to streets or areas are being renovated from the ground up that they often find bones (or pieces of bones) of long dead citizens.  Most new buildings are built above areas were dozens of people have died and were buried - and they are all said to be haunted.  Other buildings and houses - historic buildings, that still exist today, are said to be haunted by the people who died in the house, being unable to escape - they headed upward until there was no escape, but the water continued to rise.  

The island has many historic houses and many of those can be toured or even stayed in - very few people leave without an experience.  Around 10 (or so) years ago, my brother (and his family) were taking a cruise out of Galveston and they stayed in one of the (many) old mansions which is now a small bed & breakfast.  Three stories high and no elevators, so stairs are the only way around.  He likes his cigars, so went outside to have one before going to bed.  He says that as he was heading up the stairs he started hearing footsteps behind him - he turned but nothing was there.  As most people will think, he figured he just heard something - but it continued following him until he stopped and the footsteps continued on, past him.  He swears to this story.  

Most of the Galveston hotels (or just about anywhere) have their ghost tales.  Even our local Walmart has its share of stories.  It's built on the former site of an orphanage.  This orphanage, at the time was at sea level, was run by nuns.  In an effort to save the children the nuns roped themselves to the children and attempted to keep everyone together in the orphanage - the building was destroyed by the surge and all but two children died.  The store is said to be haunted and that many mornings the employees come in to find toys opened and played with or bikes in the produce section.  

So... are there ghosts or just wild imaginations?  Like a crappy cleanup by the night crew of Walmart?  Echoes of your own footsteps in the stairway of the hotel?  All I know for sure is if I ever see one... I'm moving.  

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Hayjude on Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:35 pm

But will they do you harm or are they just, as Jasper has said, postcards or picture memories left upon the landscape...?
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by DeeDee on Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:43 pm

If you have no fear of it, then I suppose it doesn't matter and maybe you'd stick around to find out.  I don't intend to stick around and find out. 

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Tarabeth on Sat Feb 03, 2018 2:52 am

There is movie that has just come out about a famous Ghost Story near where I live.  I live close to the Winchester Mystery House (but, I have never been there...I am a bit scared of ghosts).  


The house was owned by Sarah Winchester who was the widow of Firearm millionaire William Winchester.

The house is said to be haunted with the ghosts of those killed by Winchester rifles.  

The folklore is something along the lines of that if Sarah kept the house under construction the ghosts couldn't get her.  So supposedly the house was under constant construction until the day she died.  There are stairwells that dead end into walls.  Doors that go no where, and room with no entrances.  

At Halloween and whenever there is a Friday the 13th the mansion does night time flashlight tours.


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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by DeeDee on Sat Feb 03, 2018 2:56 am

I saw a short (I guess it was a) documentary on that house years ago.  It was a very interesting story of that house and what she did to keep the ghosts away.  

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Dells on Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:54 am

So in the city I live just outside of, there's a closed-down psychiatric hospital (I believe it operated 1900s-1970s). It had 47 buildings, most of which are either abandoned or have been demolished, but one building--I think it's the tuberculosis ward?--is being used as a haunted house which is open every weekend in the month of October. The other buildings are closed to the public, but many people have snuck in and reported ghostly encounters. There's also a tale about one of the cemeteries on the hospital grounds.

There was a man who worked as a gravedigger at the psychiatric hospital. It's said that following burial services for deceased patients, he would lean against an old elm tree and weep for the dead. The story goes that when the gravedigger died, his funeral was attended by hundreds of patients and staff members (including the first director/superintendent of the hospital, who documented the tale as well as several other witnesses). Workers attempted to lower what should have been a heavy casket, but it felt empty. They heard a crying sound echoed from the elm tree and everyone in attendance turned and looked. They all claimed to have seen the gravedigger standing by the tree. They even opened the casket to check if the corpse was still there. As the lid was opened, the crying stopped and the gravedigger's corpse was found undisturbed in the coffin. Days passed and the elm tree started to die. Several of the grounds crewmen tried to remove the elm tree, or the "crying tree" as it became. None were successful, citing the weeping emanating from the tree. In later years, the elm was struck during a lightning storm and was finally removed.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by 5116sue on Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:38 am

What great tales. One of the reasons I love travelling is the wealth of stories every new place has to offer. Human suffering whether by natural disaster, cruelty, war, disease always leaves an indelible mark on the place and the people.

I live in an area where ancient superstition and myth have survived and evolved to encompass the religious upheavals of the later medieval period and the industrial revolution. In this age of reason, we tend to dismiss the fears of our ancient ancestors, regarding them as child like or simple but I defy anybody, who finds themselves alone, on a dark winters night in an ancient wood or a bleak moor without the trappings of modern communication not to feel the sheer terror of being at the mercy of those long forgotten spirits who suck all rational thought from your head.

Witches and Boggarts (pre Harry Potter) stalked the land and delighted in teasing and prodding at our basic anxieties. Boggarts can assume many forms but the one that inhabited the town that I grew up near usually took the shape of a headless dog. Its malevolent form was seen to shift with unearthly grace between the sight of an old Leper hospital and a Franciscan Friary. These sights are now a church and a hotel. The sprite was often accompanied by the sounds of rattling chains or howling wind and would sometimes change form but it was always headless. The beast was said to be a portent of death or disaster especially to those who witnessed it or the inhabitants of the dwelling it rested near. During a time of religious upheaval, the headless dog was seen guarding the bodies of sixteen rebels whose bodies swung from the gallows on a hill above the old town. At that site now is a church called, ‘English Martyrs’ named after the Jacobites that were executed there.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by 5116sue on Sat Feb 03, 2018 11:40 am

I forgot the witches. I'll try again later, don't want them to feel neglected.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by KateM on Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:03 pm

So... I think pretty much all of you have heard of the Plague of London in 1665, yes?  But how many of you know of Eyam?



Pretty isn't it??

But, in 1665 a parcel of cloth was sent from London to a tailor, who lodged in the cottages next to St Lawrence's church.. the cloth when he unwrapped it was damp and he set it in front of the fire to dry.  Not realising that it was full of fleas carrying the plague.  He and his landlady's young son were the first victims of the plague.  Initially the villagers planned to flee the village, but their vicar persuaded the senior members of the village that they should not only remain, but cut themselves off from the outside world to prevent the plague spreading.  Food and medical supplies were left at a well some way outside and above the village by local landholders, in exchange for coins which were immersed in vinegar filled troughs, though to prevent the plague spreading... 

Within 12 months Eyam had gone from being a village of 350 residents to just 83, the last dying on 1st November 1666.

Today it's one of the most haunted places in Derbyshire.  The vicar's wife, Catherine, haunts the churchyard in a white dress, the property now known as Eyam Hall by an elderly man on one fo the upper floors, and by the ghost of Sarah Mills, who had been a servant there.  The Miner's Arms has several ghosts, an elderly lady dressed in black, thought to be a former landlord's wife, and two young girls can be heard skipping along the upstairs corridors... they also open and close doors and can be heard to giggle...

Visitors to the pub have been known to pack up and leave in the middle of the night...

Then there are the plague cottages, next to the church, where the cloth was first delivered...where if you stay, you may be woken in the middle of the night by a pleasant faced middle aged lady dressed in a blue smock

Throughout the village there are placards showing who died and when...

 
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Trisha Louise on Sat Feb 03, 2018 12:53 pm

You all have a gift for storytelling. This is a great thread.


A lot of kids here will have grown up hearing or reading a story book based on the Australian Aboriginal legend of the bunyip. I certainly did. The name comes from the  language of the Wemba-Wemba people of south-eastern Australia but the bunyip is found across large parts of Australia under different names. Some say it has the head of a dog and the body of a crocodile, whilst to others it has dark fur like a seal or many eyes and a maw of huge teeth. A water spirit, a devil, it lurks by billabongs, rivers and watering holes. A night hunter, the bunyip sneaks up on its prey and lets out a fearsome booming roar in the moment before the kill. 



(Drawing of the bunyip 1890, courtesy of Wikipedia)


Some scholars think the bunyip might be a cultural memory of the now extinct mega fauna that once roamed the continent  (imagine a wombat the size of a small car), whilst others say it is a bogeyman figure designed to scare children away from the very real threats posed by the water and wandering away, a myth that played easily into the fears of the European settlers faced with the unfamiliar bush. Readily explained away as myth, fantasy, cautionary tale. Only a child would hold its breath, yes?And yet...in the bush at night, if you hear the heavy footfall on the river bank and snap of a branch, where will your mind go? Can you feel the breath of the bunyip? Its howl will be the last thing you hear.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by hellspark72 on Sat Feb 03, 2018 5:54 pm

If I were visiting the Ranch and the guys asked me to share something about where I live I would probably tell them about this. I think Jasper, especially, would really appreciate it.

Not a ghost story or folklore, exactly, but a historical tradition that happens every night in the tiny city I live in. I say "city" because Culemborg has had city rights since 1318 CE, but it is tiny. 

Every night around 21:55 (8:55 PM) the "porridge bell" rings, i.e. the city gate's bells ring nonstop for about 5 minutes. This has been a signal that the city gates were about to close ever since the Middle ages, although the city gate doesn't close anymore, these days.

In the Middle Ages, the city gates did close and lock at 10 every night and if you were working on the fields around the city, you had a few minutes after the bells rung to get home. It is called the porridge bell because people would eat a bowl of porridge after returning home before going to bed.

Culemborg was a "free city" in the Middle Ages, which meant that the laws of the rest of the Netherlands were not enforced within the city walls. Debt collectors or sheriffs from outside the city had no jurisdiction in Culemborg. So after the gate was closed you were safe from the people who were after you for the night.

I live close enough to "downtown" Culemborg to hear the bells every night and I love it. I feel a very real connection to the past whenever I hear it. 

If you want to see what Culemborg looks like, watch this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWVfgG1zF18
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Missty on Sat Feb 03, 2018 6:35 pm

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Zicat on Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:12 pm

What a beautiful city you live in, hellspark72. When I visited the UK and Europe, many years ago, I was fascinated by the history. Australia is such a "young" Country, that being able to see, touch and learn about, places that have been around for so many more centuries was amazing.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Ranger52899 on Sat Feb 03, 2018 9:55 pm

Kate, I've never been to Eyam but have read about it many times. One of the saddest things about the names and dates on the plaques is the time spans between them. Sometimes months where the family must have hoped they'd been spared only then to lose another one. Tragic. I grew up a couple of miles away from wheat fields with a lone church standing in them by itself. It had been in the middle of a village, but so many died there during the plague that the village was abandoned. From the air you could still see the marks of the streets on the land, but only the church had been strongly built enough to survive.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by KateM on Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:35 am

If you do get a chance to go to Eyam then do, it's a beautiful place - though I'd recommend going out of the summer holidays as it gets very touristy - I like to go late September time when it's quiet and rather spooky.

Of course, there are a fair few other ghosts round here .... including the the Winnats Pass Ghosts..




Above Castleton, and the famous Blue John Caverns (Speedwell in particular - where you go on a boat round the cavern and they tell you ghost stories) is Winnats Pass, where in 1758, Alan and Clara eloped along, on their way to High Peak Chapel - which at the time was the English version of Gretna Green.  They stayed the night in an inn in Castleton, where their rather finer clothing came to the attention of a group of down on their luck miners.

The next day, a they rode along the pass, Alan and Clara were ambushed by five men, who pulled them from their horses, robbed and murdered them... dropping their bodies down an abandoned mine shaft.

Their bodies lay undiscovered for around 10 years, before they were discovered. They are now buried in St Edmunds Church in Castleton and Clara's red leather saddle is on display in the Speedwell museum

The robbers, despite stealing around £300, did not fare well, all suffering tragic fates. One fell from a cliff, another was hit by a falling stone, both near the site of the murder.  Another went mad, and a fourth committed suicide.  The final man made a guilt ridden confession from his deathbed after a lifetime of poor health and bad investments which left him bankrupt.

These days, if the wind is in the right direction, when you travel the pass you might hear the ghosts of not only Alan and Clara but the robbers as well...

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by KateM on Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:28 am

Okay, this is probably one of my favourite ghost stories - or rather what's strangely called an "environmental manifestation".

in 1990, in the area of Firth Park in Sheffield, a woman and her daughter were walking home when the spotted what they thought must be a new fish & chip shop.  It was open, there were lights on and both staff and customers in side.

A few nights later they decided they'd go and try out the new take away.......... but it wasn't there.... instead was a much larger DIY shop, about twice the size of the chippy.






Cos obviously "whats" like to have a nice fish supper now and again... 
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Trisha Louise on Sun Feb 04, 2018 11:31 am

I do like the thought that some good chips could lure back the dead. Maybe that's the origins of the chip van outside the pub, reviving those who need it for their walk home?
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by quaintblueoak on Sun Feb 04, 2018 5:34 pm

I am an American of French-Canadian descent.  Let me tell you the story of Le Chasse-Galerie: The Devil's Canoe, as it was told to me as a child, part of Michigan and Canadian history.  

So way back here in Michigan when the trees towered overhead, and the forest was thick and quiet, trappers and loggers crept in, awed by the bounty of the land.  Quiet and silent they worked through the days, and often through the nights, solitary and snow-bound.  Frost on their eyelashes and moustaches, they snowshoed through the wilds and wonders, stopping to melt water from frozen waterfalls, and only venturing out onto the greatness of the lakes if there was room for a canoe between the ice floes.   The hard cold season was creeping in, and the trappers drifted into logging camps.   

And in one tent, the men told tales en Francais, of the forests in the Gatineau Mountains of Canada, from their own wild youth.  Pipe smoke hung thick in the rough cabins, and rum flowed freely, the men daring the young ones to dip their snow-candy into the rum, and laughing like wild things when the snow-cold molasses treats melted into the bottomless cups. 

"Eh, you know, you pups, that at home, we let the sled dogs do the work, to pull the loads and the furs.  You don't know what you're missing," Antoine said, tossing a bit of venison jerky in the air and snatching it back before Joseph could steal it.  

Claude laughed, and swiped at the man.  "And so were we there, we could be whisked up and away in the Devil's Gauntlet!  I'll take our snug camp any day."

There was a hush in the room, and a voice from one of the corners full of lazing men inquired, "And what is the Devil's Gauntlet?"

Claude and Antoine sobered, setting their cups down, and eyeing one another.  "Should we tell it?  I don't know," Antoine mused.  A packet of tobacco landed in his lap a moment of later, and then another in Claude's, and their mugs were refilled with good drink.

"I suppose we must, so they know," Claude replied.  "Shall I begin?"

Antoine snorted, coughing a little as he drew too strongly upon his pipe.  "You may as well.  I'l have to tell how we were rescued, you little girl."

The men roared, but quieted quickly as Antoine leaned forward, an elbow on his knee, his thickly bearded chin on his fist.  His eyes sparkled as the hush grew, tense and expectant, and so he began.

"And so we were up in the north where the fur fish flourish, and a man can make the northern lights dance with a strong fist on his supper table.  Camping out there in the snow deeper than a man's head, the dogs  running light on the crust.  And when all were too tired to take a step further, numb with cold and faint with hunger, we slept. The dogs packed around us like wolves in a den, ready to defend us.  And then, up, Up, UP they leapt, acry and ahowl, and when we had them hushed, we could hear the singing."

"On we go, boys, on we go," Claude murmured, and the hairs stood up on the necks of the men who clutched mugs of coffee, rather than rum.

"We neither could fathom it, so fools that we are, we climbed out of the snug and looked - and there in the sky, a birchbark canoe, paddled by eight men!  It was yet distant, and we had not unhooked the dogs from their traces, so we untangled them into a running line, and set them off with a mighty MUSH!"

"And do you know," Claude said.  "That canoe in the sky, it paddled faster and faster, and as we shouted and begged for the dogs to go faster and faster, the lead, he stumbled and fell.   Snow swirled around us, barely able to see from dog to dog, and Antoine, he fumbled his way up and coaxed the lead dog up, and back into his traces, untangling the harness, looking at the sky every fifth moment."

Antoine nodded.  "Aye, and he fought me, did that beast, until I looked him in the eye, and told him who was boss!  And I promised him fresh red deer for his supper, if he could up and run - for if the Devil's Canoe caught up to us, they would sweep us out of our shoes, and along with them on their way to the dead.  I kept my head down, boys, I looked at the dogs, and the harness, and the snow and nothing but, for if I'd met the eyes of that crew, we would have been lost."

Here Antoine gave a long pause, and turned to Claude.  Claude chuckled.  "And that's no joke!  He didn't even run back to the sled, he grabbed hold as we began flying by, and the chanting grew closer and closer!"

"On we go, boys, on we go..."  Antoine repeated the phrase, hushed whispers sneaking into the consciousness of the men in the cabin, widening their eyes and sending a shiver among them.  They traded the tale back and forth, so that each man could wet his throat with rum or coffee as he chose, and take a long draw from his pipe.

"Those dogs, they fought and snapped and ran, and we cheered them on, chasing that lazy lead dog on, dashing through the night towards the settlement, though it was miles and miles ahead."

"So close behind us, catching us up, and then again drifting behind, we ran with the night until the sky blurred into grey, and the first finger of dawn leapt over a stand of scrubby pines and into our eyes.   Hoarse from shouting the dogs on, we drove them forward, until they scrabbled to a stop under a rough shelter at the edge of the town."

"There was a cry of anguish from the sky, and I tell you, the edge of that canoe bumped into the roof of that shelter, and shook the dust of years down around us, smudging our faces, and dirtying the fur of the dogs. A burly man burst out of the cabin, and went to his knees to hold the dogs, his ruddy face as white as the snow, glancing in fear at the sky."

"But the Devil's Canoe, she and her crew, they scraped the roof one last time, and we stumbled to the lead dogs, fishing in our pockets for treats to praise them."

A sigh of relief went through the room.  And then Antoine winked at them.  "Oh, but I'm not through yet, boys.  The lead dog, he was snapping and snarling at the owner of that wayside cabin, and his cry brought a chill to us - Claude, he tripped over something dangling from the traces, and fell face first before the lead dog - who wasn't the lead at all."

Claude nodded, solemnly, drawing from his pipe, and puffing out the sweet smoke.  "There was a wolf between the traces," he said quietly.  "And the burden that tripped me, our lead dog, his throat torn out, and limp."

"Emile, from the cabin, he drew the biggest knife I've seen yet from his belt, and slashed at the traces.  We watched, unable to gather ourselves, as the wolf raced from the shelter, and took a great leap into the sky... into the Devil's Canoe."  Antoine spoke into absolute silence.

"And that, my friends, is why we are he with you today, for that brave dog, and clever Emile.  And why we are not out dragging the trap lines, but cabined up with you logger dogs for the winter, where we will be safe from harm-"

"And not risk a ride to Hell herself on the Devil's Canoe."

The room was silent as a pin afterwards, and the men filtered out slowly, in twos and threes, until just Claude and Antoine were left.  

"But is it true," the youngest of the lot asked, eyeing the two older men, swaying gently with their rum and their exhaustion.

"Oh, it's true, my boy.  And you'd best stay here with us - look here," Antoine said gently, bringing out a well worn hide, covered in scratches and scrambles.  "There's the mark of the oars, and the teeth of the wolf, and the slice from Emile's knife, you see.  There's room for you by the fire just there," Antoine continued, giving Claude a hand up, and letting the other man lean on him as he stumbled to the pile of furs in his bed.  "Claude and I won't mind - and you'll be more careful the next time, won't you."

Antoine fell into his own bed, and faintly between the snores, the young man caught a faint refrain from outside:  "On we go, boys, on we go."
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Ranger52899 on Sun Feb 04, 2018 5:52 pm

That's lovely, Quaint!
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by DeeDee on Sun Feb 04, 2018 5:53 pm

What a great story!

Dee
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Ranger52899 on Sun Feb 04, 2018 5:58 pm

Kate, your Sheffield manifesting chippy reminded me - the abbey in this town is long gone and the foundations are underneath a shopping centre, but a monk in a grey cowl is often seen at night and is well known to the cleaning staff. He's apparently friendly and seems to like window shopping. (Obviously not a yak whomper.)
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by katkero on Sun Feb 04, 2018 8:38 pm

@LLALVA wrote:Today is the Candelaria day in Mexico, it translates as the Candle day, and it is a tradition to eat tamales and hot chocolate today. 
The tamales are made of cornflour and lard, and are filled in with pork or chicken or chiles, and have several options in sauces, like red, green, or mole. They can also be sweet, and have fillings of pine apple and raisins. 
The Mexican chocolate is not too sweet, and hot is great. 

I hope you could be able to smell them, they are soft and warm and tasty 

https://www.thinglink.com/scene/835283430462717953

All day long, in the work places and homes, people get together today to share the tamales with family and friends. 


Hugs
In Belgium we had candle day also on feb 2nd. It's called Maria Lichtmis in Dutch. But we eat crepes that day.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by DeeDee on Sun Feb 04, 2018 10:19 pm

So in further digging up history of my area, I found out that Galveston was basically founded by our famous pirate - Jean Lafitte (or Laffite - as he spelled it).  I, however, don't think our favorite pirate (David) would have too much in common with him.  Although Lafitte's fleet would capture ships and steal the goods and slaves aboard, they would then later return the vessel to the captain/owner - that seems to be his only 'redeeming value' (a phrase I use very very loosely).  

He wasn't a good man, though some may want to paint him that way, but he did put Galveston on the map if only because the (then) US sent ships to stop his raiding which was smuggling goods into the US.  

Before being run out of Galveston he burned his (quite large) home which is on the wharf (Harborside drive).  It is an area that can be seen but not visited - due to much destruction by both him and ensuing hurricanes.  But a good portion of the building/structure still stands today.  

I think David might have had words with him had they lived at the same time.  

Dee
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by 5116sue on Mon Apr 02, 2018 5:27 pm

This thread is one that I particularly enjoyed during the winter camp out. I love stories, history and traditions of all kinds. I’m just adding this here as it’s a tradition that has existed in a town near to me for centuries and would have happened today had it not rained continuously. 


At Easter, eggs have been boiled in onion skins and used as decorations for hundreds of years. Now it is mainly children who boil and paint eggs to make them colourful. These Eggs are called Pace-Eggs and were given to bands of performers as payment for entertainment or thrown at them if they failed to entertain.

The Pace-Eggs are also used for rolling down hills as a sport, the best eggs rolled the furthest or fastest without cracking and small prizes are given. The occasion is now celebrated by inviting local bands, artists and traditional crafts people who set up stalls and feed the crowds. As in all celebrations health and safety does need to be considered. Any large pieces of egg shell must be crushed as the Lancashire Witches use them as boats!

KateM - thank you for the information on Eyam, I passed the info on to a colleague who was teaching about the plague.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Nonni on Mon Apr 02, 2018 11:42 pm

Sue, do you know the pace-egging song?
Here's one two three jolly lads all in one mind
and we've come a pace egging and we hope you'll prove kind
And we hope you'll prove kind with your eggs and strong beer

or we'll come no more nigh you until the next year.

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by jkfan on Tue Apr 03, 2018 2:18 am

I just looked up Pace Eggs - they're beautiful.  I can remember coloring eggs with Pas kits, and they weren't half as nice as these.  I might try to make some just for fun.

Thanks for your post, Sue, and Nonni for the song!
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by 5116sue on Tue Apr 03, 2018 5:16 am

I haven't heard the song Nonni thank you. The Pace Egg plays are an old tradition something akin to the Medieval mystery plays. This tradition has been revived in recent decades with the players known as Pace-Eggers or Tosspots! 
I hope the last word doesn't contravene any rules but it is historical and that's my excuse, I have to admit it always raises a smile. 
Cheryl, if you do make Pace Eggs and want to roll them hope you have better luck with the weather and remember to crush any egg shells!
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by jkfan on Tue Apr 03, 2018 4:38 pm

@5116sue wrote:I haven't heard the song Nonni thank you. The Pace Egg plays are an old tradition something akin to the Medieval mystery plays. This tradition has been revived in recent decades with the players known as Pace-Eggers or Tosspots! 
I hope the last word doesn't contravene any rules but it is historical and that's my excuse, I have to admit it always raises a smile. 
Cheryl, if you do make Pace Eggs and want to roll them hope you have better luck with the weather and remember to crush any egg shells!
No - not looking to roll them, Sue.  I just wanted to make some because they look so pretty.  

The shells will get crushed, because I'll probably use the eggs to make egg salad.
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Nonni on Wed Apr 04, 2018 1:48 am

Here's the song sung with a photo of one of the Pace Egging plays.  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iK0Otv9KkBY

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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by 5116sue on Wed Apr 04, 2018 4:33 am

Thanks Nonni, I followed your link and enjoyed the song. I found this version and was enthralled by it. The accent is wonderful, the pictures fascinating, a real voice from the past. 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOAuFpJ3L9U
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Re: Our bit of the world - The Folklore and Ghost Story thread

Post by Nonni on Thu Apr 05, 2018 5:48 am

Wow Sue!! I hadn't heard this version. I love it and you are right the pictures are wonderful.   
I may have to learn this version for May Day singing!

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